2013-10-17 / News

Focus on Wildlife



In mid-September, wildlife photographer Chuck Homler was exploring the Scarborough Marsh and crawling to photograph a lesser yellowlegs. “It didn’t mind my presence for a few minutes as I shot a series of photos. Then all of a sudden it flushed and was joined by another bird that I hadn’t noticed. I looked up, and about 20 feet above me was a Northern Harrier,” he said. “Luckily for me, she looked backwards, almost over-the-shoulder, at me as she prosecuted the marsh looking for prey,” he added. The Northern Harrier is a unique hawk, for they are blessed with keen hearing as well as vision. Their face is disc shaped like an owl’s to help them hear their prey as they hug the terrain and fly very low to the ground to gain the element of surprise. In mid-September, wildlife photographer Chuck Homler was exploring the Scarborough Marsh and crawling to photograph a lesser yellowlegs. “It didn’t mind my presence for a few minutes as I shot a series of photos. Then all of a sudden it flushed and was joined by another bird that I hadn’t noticed. I looked up, and about 20 feet above me was a Northern Harrier,” he said. “Luckily for me, she looked backwards, almost over-the-shoulder, at me as she prosecuted the marsh looking for prey,” he added. The Northern Harrier is a unique hawk, for they are blessed with keen hearing as well as vision. Their face is disc shaped like an owl’s to help them hear their prey as they hug the terrain and fly very low to the ground to gain the element of surprise.

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