2017-01-19 / News

Owner still searches for Beagle missing since October

By Anthony Aloisio
Staff Writer


Sadie has been missing since the end of October. She can be identified by some distinct qualities, according to Keith Doyon, her owner. She has a white patch on her left shoulder, and her chest is completely white. She has a lot of black coloring for a tri-color beagle, Doyon said. Additionally, Sadie has all four of her “dewclaws” – the thumb-like fifth claw that dogs have, raised away from their other four claws on the ground – which is unique since many beagles have them removed. Sadie has a distinctive high-pitched bark, Doyon said, whereas most beagles have a lower howl. (Courtesy photo) Sadie has been missing since the end of October. She can be identified by some distinct qualities, according to Keith Doyon, her owner. She has a white patch on her left shoulder, and her chest is completely white. She has a lot of black coloring for a tri-color beagle, Doyon said. Additionally, Sadie has all four of her “dewclaws” – the thumb-like fifth claw that dogs have, raised away from their other four claws on the ground – which is unique since many beagles have them removed. Sadie has a distinctive high-pitched bark, Doyon said, whereas most beagles have a lower howl. (Courtesy photo) SACO – A pet beagle has been missing from Saco since the end of October, and no progress has been made since early November in determining her whereabouts.

Sadie, a tri-color beagle, ran away from owner Keith Doyon while the two were visiting a friend at a house near Thornton Academy on Oct. 29. Doyon said they had been on the porch of the house and Sadie, generally under voice control, disappeared from the porch when he briefly went inside without her.

When Sadie, 9, didn’t return, Doyon said he hired a tracking dog to follow Sadie’s scent for two separate days – once nine days after she was lost and again two days later.

“We found out that she made it out of the woods behind Thornton, which is good because it’s highly infested with coyotes,” Doyon said.

From there, he said, the scent led into the downtown area and to near Deering Lumber, where Route 1 meets the Saco River. The scent was lost there, and Doyon thinks that Sadie got picked up at the side of the road at that point.

The effort since then has been focused on publicizing Sadie’s status, Doyon said. He operates a Facebook page, Bring Sadie home, with 450 followers, and he and others have distributed about 1,400 fliers, including outside the city, as far as Rockland. Doyon is concerned that Sadie may have been taken somewhere far from Saco, where local news and outreach would not get to people who know where she is.

“I’ve contacted all the (TV) news stations, trying to get a 30-second clip on the news,” he said. “No luck with that.”

Doyon is offering a cash reward for Sadie’s return. He offers $1,000 for the return of Sadie safe and unharmed, and no questions will be asked. Additionally, he offers $200 for valid information that leads to her return.

Doyon has received about six calls with claims that a dog has been discovered that may be her. For each call he has checked to confirm that the dogs are in fact not Sadie.

Sadie can be recognized by her pictures, which are also available on the Facebook page, or by her distinctive qualities. Most distinct, Doyon said, is a white spot on her left shoulder.

“It’s kind of heart-shaped, not exactly,” Doyon said.

Sadie’s chest is completely white, and she has a lot of black coloring on the rest of her body. Additionally, she has all four of her “dewclaws”– the raised fifth claws dogs have on their feet – which is distinct because most beagles have those claws removed. Her bark is highpitched relative to most beagles, Doyon said, because most beagles have a lower howl-like bark.

Maine Lost Dog Recovery, an organization that helps publicize lost dogs and offers guidance, has created flyers and assisted Doyon with searching for Sadie. That group was started in 2011 as a bulletin board, and now operates a Facebook page with about 30,000 followers, according to Natalie Messier, president of the group.

“In winter, the fear is that lost dogs cannot survive the temperatures, but we have not found that to be true,” Messier wrote to the Courier. “They are very resourceful. My first lost dog case was lost in September of 2011 and recovered in May of 2012.”

She added that raising awareness is key to recovering a lost dog.

“A dog’s breed, temperament and disposition are all factors in how they behave when lost,” Messier said. “Getting sightings is the number one way to retrieve your dog, via social media but also getting fliers posted roadside as it’s often that passing motorist who spots your dog.

“Shorter days are a factor for sure, making sightings more challenging. Working breeds and scent hounds like Sadie can travel very far so expanding flyers and using social media to get the word out is very important. Dogs easily travel across town lines and use powerlines, snowmobile trails and (railroad) tracks to travel and can pop up several towns away easily.”

According to Messier, a finder of a lost dog is required by law in Maine to report the dog found.

Messier also advised owners that it’s important to keep an identification tag on dogs at all times.

“Micro-chips are highly recommended as they can’t fall off,” she added. “And as long as the registration is up to date with current info, your dog can be scanned for a chip by any veterinarian, animal control officer or shelter.”

Another dog identification technology is tattoos, which can appear on dogs on their stomach or under their ear. That kind of identification is rare, Messier said, because the ink is often hidden under fur so people don’t notice.

Sadie is not microchipped or tattooed, Doyon said, but he said that she was wearing her tags when she was lost. He said he regrets that Sadie’s name appeared on her tag, because he thinks that that may have made her easier to steal.

“I realized that, once you have a dog’s name, you have a lot more control over the dog,” Doyon said.

The most important thing to Doyon is that Sadie be returned to him safe.

“I’ve been sad every day since she’s been gone,” he said.

Contact Staff Writer Anthony Aloisio at news@inthecourier.com.

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