2018-02-01 / News

New friends



Left, Rylee Willis, 6, gets an opportunity to visit with one of the Animal Welfare Society’s puppies. Colleen Williams, the program’s coordinator, said Shelter Helpers is one of the department’s most popular programs and usually is full within a week of posting. The program runs for six weeks in Old Orchard Beach and the Animal Welfare Society is looking for more recreation departments to join. Williams said the Biddeford Recreation Department will start its own program soon. Below, left, Williams, left, and Taylor Miller, 9, visit with 9-monthold Remington. The Animal Welfare Society’s humane educator Megan Cross shared a lesson with the students about the shelter dogs’ behavior. While some dogs in the shelter may bark or seem antisocial, Cross reminded students that the shelter is not a normal environment and therefore the dogs are not portraying normal behavior. Cross emphasized the importance of understand the dog or cat’s perspective. Bottom left, Taylor Miller, 9, left and Kamryn Arey, 7, help spruce up a sheet that will eventually be used for a cat cage at the shelter. The shelter receives donations of white sheets and allowed children to tie dye them. Shelter helpers is available for students in kindergarten through grade five. (Grant McPherson photos) Left, Rylee Willis, 6, gets an opportunity to visit with one of the Animal Welfare Society’s puppies. Colleen Williams, the program’s coordinator, said Shelter Helpers is one of the department’s most popular programs and usually is full within a week of posting. The program runs for six weeks in Old Orchard Beach and the Animal Welfare Society is looking for more recreation departments to join. Williams said the Biddeford Recreation Department will start its own program soon. Below, left, Williams, left, and Taylor Miller, 9, visit with 9-monthold Remington. The Animal Welfare Society’s humane educator Megan Cross shared a lesson with the students about the shelter dogs’ behavior. While some dogs in the shelter may bark or seem antisocial, Cross reminded students that the shelter is not a normal environment and therefore the dogs are not portraying normal behavior. Cross emphasized the importance of understand the dog or cat’s perspective. Bottom left, Taylor Miller, 9, left and Kamryn Arey, 7, help spruce up a sheet that will eventually be used for a cat cage at the shelter. The shelter receives donations of white sheets and allowed children to tie dye them. Shelter helpers is available for students in kindergarten through grade five. (Grant McPherson photos)



Marcus Ciccariello, 9, greets Remington, a 9-month-old German Shepherd. Ciccariello is practicing the proper techniques for approaching a dog that Megan Cross, the Animal Welfare Society’s humane educator, taught him and his classmates. Cross taught the students to avoid eye contact, keep their voices low and remain calm so that the dogs in the shelter feel as comfortable as possible. Marcus Ciccariello, 9, greets Remington, a 9-month-old German Shepherd. Ciccariello is practicing the proper techniques for approaching a dog that Megan Cross, the Animal Welfare Society’s humane educator, taught him and his classmates. Cross taught the students to avoid eye contact, keep their voices low and remain calm so that the dogs in the shelter feel as comfortable as possible.

Return to top